Eggless Nog Smoothie: Sweet Potato Smoothie | Eggless EggNog Recipe

Eggnog is one of my favorite holiday treats – but now that I know I’m egg-sensitive, I had to put on my thinking-chef’s hat

and get creative in the kitchen -

which I love doing!

eggless nog smoothie

I used some leftover, naturally sweet garnet yams as the base. This thickened the smoothie, and added great fiber.

I’ve been feeling very “featherweight” lately, which is one of my cravings types (I’m a dual type, also Fire Brand, or Pitta)

and wanted to add some spices that would help me feel warm and comfy.

Earth Mama/Papa types can add some ginger to this recipe to help them feel more energized and uplifted!

Don’t know your cravings type? Take the free quiz here and get your type and report! 

Eggless Nog Smoothie Recipe:

12 ounces unsweetened almond or coconut milk
½ cup water
1 cup cooked sweet potato (peeled)
2-3 pitted Medjool dates (the big juicy ones) cut in half
1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp fresh nutmeg

Combine all ingredients in the blender.

Blend, pour, sip and smile!

Saying ‘no’ – on boundaries and cravings

 

 

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The body sets boundaries for us all the time, but how well do we listen and head the body’s message? 

Saying ‘no’ is as important as saying ‘yes!’

Saying no to other people’s to-dos, and saying yes to more quality sleep.

Saying no to the diet industrial complex, its rules and size requirements, and saying yes to deep, true healing.

Saying no to the fast food lifestyle, and instead embracing real food.

Saying no to a life of punishment, deprivation, and lack-luster experiences, and saying YES to pleasure, fun, and play!

This is the call. Will you answer it?


Get the free 50+ recipe e-cookbook that puts all this into action:www.womenfoodanddesire.com

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When we respect our cravings, real transformation is possible.

WFD image 1   We need to start listening to our bodies, rather than the “diet industrial complex.” We’ve handed over our power to heal and our deep inner knowing to outside “experts” and “gurus” for far too long. We stopped listening to and trusting our cravings and bodies so long ago, that we’ve been at war with ourselves. This war is killing us. We diet too much, eat too much, work too hard, worry too much, schedule too much, play too little, drink too much, shop too much, and touch too little. And there’s this big, gaping hole inside of us that will never be filled will the food, “success,” to-do lists, or new shoes. It’s time to listen to our bodies, and follow our cravings, to the life we truly desire.

Order the book today: www.womenfoodanddesire.com

Get 7+ awesome bonuses, plus the 50+ recipe cookbook that puts all of this into action, in your kitchen, today. Free. Yup.

xo, Alex

Top 50 Mindful Eating Sites of 2014

 

 

Cool news! We’ve been chosen as one of the top Mindful Eating Sites of 2014!

The top blogs were chosen based on a number of criteria including:

  • sharing research-based, practical information on nutritious eating
  • tips for ending emotional eating
  • advocating approaches other than fad dieting
  • sound psychological strategies for ending mindless eating and developing a better relationship with food

These sites were chosen by www.eatingmindfully.com, a website that has provided information on mindful eating since 2001 by Dr. Susan Albers, psychologist and author of six books on mindful eating including the books, Eating Mindfully, EatQ and 50 Ways to Soothe Yourself Without Food, an early pioneer in the field of mindful eating.

It’s an honor to be featured amongst some of my favorite sites, including Summer Tomato, Geneen Roth, and Dr. Frank Lipman.

Check out the other sites and get some powerful inspiration! 

xo,

Alex

how “it’s not that bad” is killing us – reset your adrenals now

Feeling run down…

Tired and wrung out…

Lost my mojo…

Weight loss resistant…

Irritable and moody…

This state of being is all too common – I hear it from my clients, readers, and even from myself.

And this way of “living” is killing us.

Slowly but surely, our exhaustion and overwhelm are destroying our vitality, and it’s time to end the suffering.

Our adrenals are suffering, and they are off-balance, causing:

-insomnia

-out of control sugar cravings

-hormone imbalance

-weight gain, anger and depression

If any of this resonates with you, and you’re ready to heal your body, and get your vitality back, please watch this video I made with Dr. Alan Christianson about his new book, The Adrenal Reset Diet.

This new book is my map to better energy, healed sleeping patterns and hormonal stability.
alex and alan

Dr. Alan is a brilliant, kind, generous man, and I’m lucky to call him my friend!

You can pre-order Dr. Alan’s book here,

or go to his website and learn more about his work, recommendations, and more:

BIG news: UK version of Women, Food & Desire is available for pre-order!

So excited about this cover!

The UK version of Women, Food and Desire is available for pre-order!

Click here to order: 

Can’t wait to get my hands on this version of my book-baby…

Women, Food & Desire UK

Women, Food + Desire – the book trailer

The book arrives to mailboxes and bookstores January 6th, 2015, but here’s a taste of what you’re in store for:

Pretty Holiday Hummus: Beet It Up with Beet Hummus

Holiday food should be pretty. So this dish rocks.

Especially if you’ve discovered that you have to cut out a ton of foods to get or stay healthy.

We just discovered that our family has to avoid gluten + eggs + soy (me and the boy), whey from milk (me), and corn (the kid).

So, yeah. That’s a lot of ingredients we’ll be avoiding!

BUT, I always loved a good challenge, especially in the kitchen.

AND, one way to ensure optimism + resilience is to look at the cupboard as half full, and expect the best, rather than getting depressed + overwhelmed by saying goodbye to certain ingredients.

I’m putting on my big girl panties, looking on the bright side, and putting all my energy into making delicious, nourishing foods that everyone can enjoy at the table.

One of the first places to start is with super easy, super tasty, no-fail recipes:

…like hummus.

Ok, so most hummus is already gluten-dairy-soy-corn-free, but when I saw a picture of this gorgeous dip, I couldn’t resist making it in hopes of livening up the impending Christmas table.

Ruby Red Beet Hummus

  • medium beet (1 cooked a whole bunch at once to have for later)
  • 15-ounce BPA-FREE can (1 3/4 cup) of garbanzao beans, drained
  • clove garlic
  • 1 tiny pinch cayenne
  • dash paprika
  • 2tablespoons lemon juice
  • Sea salt and pepper, to taste

How to make the best hummus ever:

First, roast the beets: Preheat oven to 400F. Clean, scrub, and cut off the stems and root end. Loosely wrap individually in foil, place on a roasting pan. Roast for 50-60 min. They’re ready when a knife can be easily inserted.

(might as well wrap a head of garlic and roast that, too – I mean, who can ever get enough roasted garlic?)

roasted beets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While you’re waiting, take a nap or watch Gilmore Girls on Netflix.

beets now

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When the beets are done, slip the outer peel off. Your hands will get red, but you’ll look pretty bad a$$.

Combine all ingredients into a food processor. Add water or additional olive oil until desired consistency. You want this to be creamy + smooth.

beet hummus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add salt and pepper, about 1/2 teaspoon at a time.
Serve with gluten-free crackers, yo! Or just eat it with a spoon, like I did.

This is a great cooling recipe for Firebrand cravings types if you add a 1/2 teaspoon of cumin, a traditional hummus ingredient (AKA Pitta in Ayurveda). The cooked beet is good for Featherweight cravings types, and this recipe is great for Earth Mamas, but go light on the added drizzle of olive oil.

Don’t know your Cravings Type? Take my quiz and get your free Cravings Type Report here:

Happy Holidays, all! Eat to be happy + healthy…xo, Alex

Positivity + Pumpkin Soup – a recipe for happiness

Feeling good…

not just about yourself, but about the world and people around you and how you feel in your body - isn’t that the big goal?

That’s why I love to cook, especially for other people, and that’s why I’ve been studying positive psychology.

It’s all about what helps us flourish – not just feel “fine.”

What I’ve learned so far may not seem totally earth shaking to you, but it has made me think hard about what I do with my time, and why.

And it’s all coming down to one thing:

Other People Matter.

Happiness and contentment aren’t about how much money you make. In fact, after our basic needs are covered (in the USofA, that’s about $50-60K a year), we don’t feel a lot happier when we make more money. We just think more money, more stuff, or having the right stuff will make us feel better about ourselves.

The one thing that makes us happy, if you’re rich or poor?

Having strong, connected relationships. Having people you can share your wins and your troubles with.

In short: we crave connection. We crave being with other people who love us. It’s a basic human need.

Well, one of my favorite things to do with other people is share good, delicious, healthy food. Making it together, talking while we cook, planning the meal, and savoring the delicious aromas and flavors – that is jus what life is all about.

So I want to share my new favorite recipe with you – a pumpkin soup, baked right in the pumpkin.

Pumpkins are wonderfully round, sweet, and immediately make me feel cozy.

They’re also super healthy! The health benefits of pumpkins or winter squash are long:

Considered an energetic tonic and a warming food, pumpkins and winter squash are medicinal for the spleen, stomach, large intestines and lungs. It improves energy and blood circulation, and is high in beta-carotene, which is good for eye health. Rich in vitamins A, C and potassium + magnesium, pumpkins are high in carotenoids and have anti-carcinogenic properties.

So this recipe is healthy, easy, fun to make, and really fun to eat with someone you love. Go be happy, love.

Pumpkin Soup Baked In A Pumpkin

For this pumpkin soup recipe, you’ll need:

1 pumpkin (edible and sweet)

2-3 tablespoons grass-fed butter, olive oil or coconut oil

1 yellow onion

2-3 cups stock or broth (vegan, chicken, etc)

salt and pepper
pumpkin

The pumpkin I was growing in my back yard was carried off by what I can only assume was a whole gang of New York City squirrels – so I had to buy one from the local farmers’ market.

I chose a 3 lb. “Sugar Pie,” which is sweeter than the standard carving pumpkin you see around Halloween. Preheat the oven to 350F.

cut pumpkin

Carve the top of the pumpkin just like you would for a jack-o-lantern. Scoop out the seeds and stringy guts, and save the seeds to salt and bake later.

Do not leave the pumpkin seeds baking for too long while you talk on the phone to a friend like I did. Please set a timer.

buttered pumpkin

Use 1-2 Tablespoons real butter, ghee, or coconut oil to coat the inside and outside of the pumpkin. Scatter a couple pinches of salt around the inside, and don’t forget the bottom of the pumpkin lid!

onions

 

Chop a yellow onion into large dice.

You could do this step first, and carve the pumpkin while the onions are cooking to save time.

cook onions

Brown the onions over medium heat for 8-10 minutes with 1 Tablespoon butter, ghee or coconut oil.

fill pumpkin onions

Fill the pumpkin with cooked onions.

 

fill pumpkin stock

Pour home made vegetable or chicken broth (or stock) over the onions, filling up the pumpkin to about 1-inch from the top.

If the broth is unsalted, add 1/2 teaspoon salt and stir well.

top pumpkin

Place the pumpkin lid back on, and place the entire pumpkin into the oven.

Bake for 1 1/2 – 2 hours, checking to test for doneness. You’ll want the inside of the pumpkin to be spoon-ably soft.


baked pumpkin

 

Remove from the oven and gently remove the top.

Use a towel to grasp the stem, as the pumpkin will emit hot steam when you open it. Have your spoons at the ready…

spoonable pumpkin

 

Eat that soup straight from the pumpkin!

I like placing it on the table amongst the family and allowing everyone to take a spoonful from the pumpkin before scooping servings out to individual bowls.

There’s just something really fun about eating soup directly from a pumpkin.

Make sure that everyone gets a bowl-full of stock, onions and cooked chunks of sweet pumpkin.

Enjoy!