Hemp Hummus for Hemp History Week

Celebrate Hemp History Week with this delicious, protein rich hummus!

Filled with satisfying protein, anti-inflammatory Omega-3′s and some wonderful seasonings, this hummus is more super-food than your average chickpea paste!

Hemp Hummus

Yield: 4 cups

3 cups cooked chickpeas, drained
1⁄2 cup shelled hemp seeds (AKA hemp hearts)
1⁄4 cup hemp seed oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1⁄4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
1⁄4 cup flat leaf parsley leaves
2 Tablespoons cumin powder
1⁄2 teaspoon cayenne powder
1 Tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
2-3 teaspoons sea salt
Optional garnish: drizzle with a little olive oil and a dusting of paprika

  • Combine all ingredients in a food processor.
  • Process until smooth. You may need to stop and scrape the sides down a few times to completely combine the hummus ingredients.

• Serve with crackers, raw veggies, and the optional garnishes. Storage: Refrigerate in an airtight, class container for up to 4 days.

Healing Weeds: Not THAT Kind of Weed! Hemp History Week Give-Away

Winning a new yoga outfit is awesome, helping improve farmer’s lives & protecting the environment is SUPER EXCITING!

I want YOU to support Hemp History Week, and when you like and share this video I made, you’ll not only support an important, growing movement in the USA, you’ll be entered to win the cute yoga outfit I’m wearing, made of, YOU GUESSED IT: HEMP!

  1. Watch, share and win here:

Here’s the situation:

Hemp should be a legal crop in the US of A, and here’s why:

  1. Hemp is NOT marijuana, it is a drug-free plant used for creating fibers and food.
  2. Hemp farmers in Canada make hundreds of dollars an acre more than American farmers who grow cotton, soy and otehr commodities, with far less toxic fertilizers and insecticides.
  3. The market for hemp products is an estimated $450 million dollars annually and growing. Even with Canada’ entry into hemp production in the late 1990′s, demand for hemp seeds and fiber is exceeding supply. U.S. farmers want an opportunity to grow this crop once again, and share in the rewards of hemp’s soaring popularity.
  4. Hemp seeds and oil are a healthy food for humans to enjoy, adding complete protein and valuable Omega-3 oils.

 

Convinced?

So was I. That’s why I am an official endorser for Hemp History Week, along with Dr. Andrew Weil, Alicia Silverstone, and more.

Please like and share the video, enter to win the hemp yoga outfit from Prana, and support Hemp History Week Here: 

 

Have you subscribed to my YouTube Channel yet? Click here, baby! 

Nut-Free School? Perfect Sandwich Recipe For Kids & Parents

Nut Free “Peanut Butter & Jelly Sandwich”

As a plant-based mom, I’m always looking for easy, healthy, tasty meals I can whip up for my son. As with most kids, Laken attends a peanut-free school. This year, his preschool class is completely nut-free, so I’ve had to make some adjustments with my normal lunch offerings.

Luckily, I’ve come upon the perfect solution for the busy parent: hemp & sunflower seed sandwiches! I like to use Food For Life’s Cinnamon Raisin bread, which is made from whole sprouted grains, has no added sugar, and tops out at 3 grams of protein per slice. This is great nutritional value added to the 9-11 grams of protein from the seed butters, depending on how much you use.

I also add a dose of protein, iron, iodine and other trace elements by sprinkling a bit of sea vegetable flakes in between the jam and nut butter. At this small dose, the kids won’t taste anything, but they’re getting an extra kick of minerals. My favorite brand is Sea Seasonings from Maine Coast Sea Vegetables (www.seaveg.com)

Ingredients:

2 slices whole grain bread

2 tablespoons hemp seed butter or sunflower seed butter

¼ teaspoon sea vegetable flakes

2 tablespoons 100% fruit jam

Directions:

I think we all know how to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, right folks?

Hemp Fudge

Healthy treats for the whole family

This recipe for hemp fudge is super high in protein and Omega-3 fatty acids, thanks to the hemp seeds, raw tahini and walnuts. If your kid is allergic to walnuts like mine, just replace with chopped almonds or skip the added nuts altogether. This recipe was a hit at my Hemp History Week cooking class, and the audience especially liked that it’s gluten-free, dairy-free and super easy!

Ingredients:

2 cups raisins (soaked at least 1 hour in enough water to cover by 2 inches)

1 cup shelled hemp seeds

16 ounces raw tahini (sesame butter)

1 cup walnuts, roughly chopped

1/2 cup cocoa powder

1/4 cup brown rice syrup

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

pinch sea salt

Directions:

1. Drain the raisins, keeping 1/2 cup of the soaking water in case you need it for blending.

2. Combine all of the ingredients, except for the soaking water, in a food processor fitted with the standard S blade. Process until the mixture becomes smooth. You may need to add some liquid to combine the ingredients better, so add 1 tablespoon at a time and blend. You will need to stop and scrape the sides down a few times.

3. Press the mixture into a 9-inch bread or casserole pan with a rubber spatula.

4. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours, or overnight, to set.

5. Remove the plastic wrap and cut into pieces and serve.

Yield: 24 pieces

Hemp Recipes That Adults & Kids Will Love!

This year’s Hemp History Week has been full of fun events and I’m hopeful that the support for legalizing this useful, safe agricultural product will grow like a weed:

- Tuesday night I co-taught a packed class at Whole Foods with Phil Lempert of Supermarketguru.com fame. We shared the delicious and healthy ways hemp can be used in cooking, along with recipes and free goodies from the Hemp History Week supporting companies. (Some of my favorites recipes are below!)

Hemp History Week Alexandra Jamieson and Phil Lempert

- Wednesday brought rain and a gorgeous luncheon hosted at Candle 79 in New York City and created by Chef Angel Ramos. The meal was filled with hemp ingredients and I was blown away. The media and blog writers I sat with had never eaten at Candle before, and they couldn’t believe how good the hemp-centric menu was! I’m sure they’ll be back for more.

Hemp History Week Endorsers Phil Lempert Alexandra Jamieson Eric Steenstra, President Vote Hemp, Musician Dar Williams and Ashley Koff R.D.

Hemp History Week Endorsers Phil Lempert Alexandra Jamieson Eric Steenstra, President Vote Hemp, Musician Dar Williams and Ashley Koff R.D.

Hemp History Week Candle 79 Joy Pierson

Hemp History Week Candle 79 Joy Pierson

- Thursday I was invited to speak at Hunter College for students in the health and biology departments. I presented information about about plant based diets and how they can be used for healing, and I also gave out products from Manibota Harvest, Living Harvest, Dr. Bronner’s, and The Merry Hempters, all sponsors of Hemp History Week. The students loved the information and loved the goodies!

- Today I got inspired to whip up a couple of easy recipes that both my son Laken and I would enjoy. For an after gym treat I made this amazing smoothie:

Hemp History Week Protein Rich Hemp Cashew Cacao "Milkshake" Recipe

Hemp History Week Protein Rich Hemp Cashew Cacao "Milkshake" Recipe

Protein Rich Hemp Cacao “Milkshake”

Ingredients:

1 cup cashews, soaked overnight and drained

3 Medjool dates, pitted

1/4 cup Manitoba Harvest hulled hemp seeds

2 tablespoons raw cacao powder

2 cups unsweetened rice milk

Blend until smoooooooth…

Hemp History Week Hemp Cashew Maple Ice Cream Recipe

Hemp History Week Hemp Cashew Maple Ice Cream Recipe

Cashew & Hemp Seed Maple Cream

Ingredients:

2 cups cashews, soaked overnight and drained

1/4 cup shelled hemp seeds

1/4 cup maple syrup

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

pinch Himalayan pink salt

1/4 cup rice milk

Blend all until smoooooth….

Celebrate & Support Hemp History Week: 5/2-5/8!

I’m honored to be an official spokesperson for Hemp History Week, which takes place for the 2nd time this May 2nd-8th!

Alex Jamieson Hemp History Week

Alex Jamieson Hemp History Week

The point of Hemp History Week is to educate the public about the safety and benefits of hemp agriculture and usage, while renewing support to legalize industrial hemp farming in the U.S.

Hemp has gotten a bad reputation from it’s Cannabis relative, marijuana, and is actually free of psychoactive ingredients. Made illegal in 1957, Hemp is grown around the world for industrial and dietary uses. Hemp fiber is one of the strongest natural fibers on earth, and requires no pesticides or agricultural chemicals, unlike cotton.

Why is this movement important to me? Hemp represents agricultural, health, and sustainability issues all in one delicious package.

The U.S. is the world’s largest importer of hemp seeds, fabric, and oils, but farmers who want to grow this crop are still in legal limbo. Canadian farmers earn $200-$400 per acre with hemp crops, while U.S. farmers net less than $50 an acre for soy and corn. Legalizing hemp would be a huge boon to farmers in this country, as well as brining more production jobs stateside for the manufacturing of hemp fabric, seeds, and industrial products that could then be made in the U.S.

I’ll be talking more about hemp and its culinary uses and nutrition next week – and I’ll be giving away a box full of hemp products! Keep your eyes open for the contest on my blog. Also, be sure to come to the cooking class I’ll be co-hosting will Phil Lempert the editor of www.SupermarketGuru.com and The Lempert Report. We’ll be talking all things hemp at the Whole Foods on Bowery and Houston on Tuesday, May 3rd. To sign up for the class, go here: